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Top Fashion Blunders Men Make That Ruin Their Charm

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Fashion Blunders Men Make

Listen up all you men out there!

You might think that you are a fashionista or a ‘cool dude’, but trust us there might be chances you are making big fashion blunders, unknowingly.

These mistakes could actually have women question your taste, if nothing else.

via GIPHY

We bring you some of the best styling tips that will make you feel like a million bucks! Join us on the journey..

Elements of style & fashion

THE CARDINAL RULE: Anything extreme in terms of fitting – too skinny or baggy is a big no.

Go for clothes that suit your body type. Don’t wear ridiculously tight dresses that will make you look like a stuffed sausage. Big boys don’t wear shapeless clothes that make them look like a balloon.

THE CARDINAL RULE
Source: Pinterest/TBM

Always create a look that flows from head to toe. The point is to pair similar cuts for your pants and upper half. For e.g.: Wearing tight-fitting pants with extremely loose jackets would look very unbalanced.

Also read: The Best 2020-21 Beauty Trends That Will Make You Feel Ecstatic!

Don’t wear attire that is too tight or loose or sexy or see-through!

This cardinal rule applies to all that you wear.

1 Shirts

No matter how ironic its sounds but most men in this world haven’t figured out how to wear a shirt properly.  Ill-fitting shirts may ruin the look of your attire.

If the shirts are long they should always be tucked inside. If it is an informal occasion choose a shirt style that has a shorter casual cut.

The undershirt/vest should not be visible while wearing a formal shirt.

Curling collars

No.

Use removable ‘collar stays’ to provide structure to the collar and prevent curling.

To check the right collars, try to fit in two fingers between your neck and collar when it is buttoned.

curling collars
Source: Google Image/

Tie too long or short

No.

The tip of your tie should only touch the middle of the top and bottom of the buckle of your belt.

tie a tie

Short-sleeved shirt

Since the 90s, donning  short sleeves shirts is no longer stylish. Unless you have an overall fashion sense and can pull it off well, avoid wearing them. If the weather is hot and comfort is what you are looking for, pay attention to the following details:

The fit

The sleeve should not be too tight or loose. The sleeve length near the middle of the biceps & width should be only as much that you can fit a finger between the sleeve and arm. These generally go well with shorts or the beach look. Wear a t-shirt underneath the shirt if you don’t want to button it up and a pair of white sneakers or tan leather flip flops would just go well with it.

 It is predominantly a summer wardrobe item. You can experiment with texture and fabric,  prints. or even brands. Use cotton or poplin or linen.

shport sleeve shirt fashion
Source: Pinterest

Long-sleeved shirt

These shirts are always the right choice for a casual business look. If the weather is hot you can always roll them up. This is mainly for the quintessential summer look, to make you look cool and professional both. 

Avoid sleeveless shirts. Women are more impressed with your overall look than your bulging biceps that you are dying to show off.

Never wear shirts buttoned up all the way and never unbutton more than 2 buttons from the top. Looks downright sleazy.

Avoid baggy type shirts that will make you look frumpier.

long sleeve shirt fashion rule

2. Pants

When it comes to pants, things that matter the most are the fall and length.  Get the pant length right. Pants with narrow bottoms are very much in. The length should not skim the tops of your shoes i.e. the pants should just touch the top of the shoelaces and cover the upper part of the rear of the shoe.

pants fashion mistakes

Pop those crotch pants out the window.

Because of their formal yet casual appearance, Chinos from 2019 trends will be carried forward to ’20. Slim fit trousers look smarter & can spice up any outfit. Capri pants are somewhat outdated and more or less replaced by cropped ones. 

Same goes for jeans. Extreme cut out jeans or big patch works should be avoided.  A few holes here and there acceptable. Low waist jeans in ’20.. Eww!

Regular trousers with parallel bottoms are a thing of the past. The long folds further spoil the look.

  3. T-shirts

Are great for hanging out around the house or casual get together with friends. It has a juvenile feel.

Rules for t-shirt sleeves are the same as shirts with short sleeves. Fitting wise you need to follow the same rules, like that for shirts. 

Very deep V neck t-shirts look good on men only if worn inside a blazer. Round or crew-neck t-shirts are more preferred.

fashion mistakes featuring T shirts

Never tuck your tee in if you are not wearing a blazer. The only exception is a Polo T if the occasion is a bit conventional.

Fashion mistakes featuring t-Shirts
Source: Pinterest

4. Footwear

Make sure that your shoes don’t let you down. Whether you are donning leather shoes or sneakers, untidy shoes are a big turn off.

 Crocs and men. Hell no!

Square toe shoes are no longer a style statement either. Go for moderately pointed ones which have a classic timeless appeal.

men fashion mistake featuring Shoes

Never wear socks with sandals or floaters. Socks should be long till your calf and should stay there. Do not wear ankle-length sports or athletic socks with pants.

never wear socks with sandals or floaters

5. Anything which is too colour-coordinated or matchy matchy –Nope!

6. Tattoos –  Big tattoos?  To say the least – No.

A teeny tiny micro tattoo – Super stylish & tasteful, any time!

mistakes men make with tattoos

Fashion should always be life enhancing, make sure these blunders don’t ruin your charm!

Dressing your age – Naah!  That’s an old school approach. You don’t have to wear what people expect you to. Just because you have hit a certain calendar year doesn’t mean you stop being trendy or chuck your comfortable shoes or accessories. Neon shirts or converse sneakers can make even the old dudes look stylish.

Also read: Is your favorite brand playing with your personality?

Trends keep changing, most of these tips are timeless and going to be there for at least 2-3 years.

Your wardrobe needs a make-over every season. Do it!

Once in a while, try something that’s not “You”. Let everyone envy your impeccable sense of style.

Watch out this space for more fashion and style tips.

Business

The True Meaning Behind the Trend of Affordable Luxury

Luxury goods are the only area in which it is possible to make luxury margins – Bernard Arnault

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Bernard Arnailt's Quote on luxury Goods

Gone is the era of brands like Chanel and Gucci ruling the shopping world. This is the era of affordable luxury.

According to yourdictionary.com: “Affordable luxury is an alluring good or service with a steep but affordable price.”

So these “affordable luxury” brands are telling us that they are going to provide us with goods that are comparable to the best products of Porsche and Rolex at a price that the common person can afford?

What are these brands? What is the idea behind affordable luxury? Is it real or just another marketing tactic to fool people?

Luxury in its Primitive Meaning

Just by definition, luxury in its primitive form is “excessive”.

It’s something scarce, made from the best of quality products, and has a sky-high price tag which only a person with a 10-digit salary cheque can afford.

These are  products made for the finest of raw materials and have the highest standards for the use of their textiles, leathers, and craftsmanship.

Luxury brands
Source

If we go by the definition above, the entire craze about “affordable luxury” is just a play of words.

It is something that only the higher section of the society, the financially privileged people, could afford.

It is there to distinguish between the privileged and the lesser-privileged.

Also read: The Best 2020-21 Beauty Trends That Will Make You Feel Ecstatic!

It’s Not Just The Brand Name, It’s The Quality

Think about Chanel, Gucci, and other prominent brands. It’s common among the masses that it’s the tag of these brands on their products that makes them different.

But can a tag justify the long life span of a commodity?

Most of the luxury products in the market have a long lifespan which not only makes them a hot item but also a one-time investment.

Most of the luxury products have good lifespan, which makes it good one time investment
Source

Lets share a story of a person who owned a Mercedes S550. The car was bought in 2007 and the owner sold it when it had travelled about 150,000 miles in 2017. Now, even when the car is at its 3rd owner, it’s still running strong.

That’s the beauty of a luxury brand. The higher price does not only define the long legacy of a brand but the fine quality of the product.

It’s a one-time investment that runs for a long time bringing customer satisfaction.

The motive is to generate an opinion among the masses that spending such money isn’t a bad idea.

Also read: Is your favorite brand playing with your personality?

Never on Sale, Never on Discount!

Has Porsche or Prada ever put up a sale? Or the grand items that are sold at auctions put up at discount? Well, no!

As strange and unbelievable it may read, it is common for big brands to destroy their prized products just so that the authenticity of their brand can be maintained.

In fact, France even called for a ban on the burning of these luxury goods by fashion brands.

Luxury products are never on sale or discount
Source

So how is it possible that on one side, possessions worth millions are destroyed instead of being made accessible to the general public, and on the other side some brands claim that the common person can pay for it?

That’s where the dirty marketing gets born!

The Essence of Affordability

Due to the rise in the demand for luxury brands, the market runners have been issuing a new trend.

The idea of affordable luxury is not just on paper but is an actual scenario that’s news in today’s world.

The new monsters in the market like Coach, Kate Spade, etc have been claiming that their products are luxurious and are available at a rate that even the common man can afford!

Coach, Kate Spade claiming their products are luxurious and affordable
Source

Now the doubt that arises here is, if it’s luxury, then how can the common man access it?

Brands are definitely known for their prices. Luxury products have sky-high rates so that they can’t be easily accessible to the middle-class public.

As already mentioned that luxury in the raw form is scarce, then what is the motive behind the idea of making luxury affordable?

Also read: Best Luxurious Eco-Resort in India

Is it Noble?

Now, what would your reaction be when you hear that you can wear shoes comparable to Nike Mag self-lacing trainers that are worth about 200,000 dollars at a cheaper rate?

People would be swooning over such a hot commodity. The whole stock would be sold in seconds without any marketing.

But ever thought that the artifact that you bought at a cheap rate, thinking that it’s a brand product, could actually be a hoax?

a cheap rate brand products, could actually be a hoax
Source

It could, in reality, be a marketing strategy played by the companies to get their product sold?

Thinking about it deeply, Even the thought that such an expensively priced product is sold at an “affordable” rate is funny!

Don’t take the legitimacy of this article wrong, it’s good news that something cheap could compare to the rate of diamonds.

The bad news here is that affordable luxury hurts the legitimate brands whose motive is to provide the best.

Not only that, they lead wannabe luxury brands to be termed as cheaters, even if their products are not that bad, ultimately harming their reputation.

Affordable Brand Vs Luxury Brands

With a real luxury brand the most important factor is its dream equation. This dream equation depends upon the availability and the demand of the product.

The real luxury products in the market are made in small numbers and are only made available to customers who are willing to pay for the excellent quality materials.

These are the people who are willing to satisfy the short supply of these products and pay a lot, just to display them at their homes.

Affordable Brand Vs Luxury Brands
Source

The minute these products start getting produced in greater numbers in order to be made available to the common public, they lose the authenticity to be called luxury.

Affordable luxury runs on the idea to merge the mediocre brands with the best, and such an idea does not result in a pretty scenario of “equality”.

There’s a strong difference between the actual luxury brands and these affordable luxuries. It’s their comparison that cements peoples’ opinion one way or another.

So the “noble” idea to make luxury affordable to all, well it’s not really that noble!

The Cycle of Repairing and Wearing!

Taking a hypothetical case of Ananya. Ananya is a normal worker with a monthly pay-cheque of rupees 50,000.

She saves for months and buys a watch for her father. The watch is from an affordable luxury brand and claims to compare with many luxury brand masters in the market.

Now of course the cost of this affordable luxury can not compare with the Rolex watches but these cannot be claimed cheap, too.

The watch looks good, her father is teary by the gift and everyone’s happy. And now the circle of “affordability” starts.

The Cycle of Repairing and Wearing min affordable product
Source

After some time when the “luxurious” watch stops working, Ananya’s father spends some money to repair it.

It’s not really disappointing as a few bucks are nothing against the value of a luxury product, but you know what’s disappointing?

It is the scenario during which the father will continue to repair the watch everytime it breaks down, thinking that it’s a luxury item so it’s okay to spend on it.

The cycle of repairing and wearing will continue and ultimately after sometime the total expenditure on the “brand” product is going to exceed the total expenses needed to buy a real luxury product.

This is the sad reality behind these quasi-brands. They claim to be affordable and yet are sufficiently expensive.

And the fact that they have a much shorter life span compared to a real luxury product proves that they’re a myth!

Know What an Oxymoron is?

Ever heard about an open secret? A secret that is known to all. A conversation, incident, or fact that is secret just in words but already known to all.

Cheap Luxury product is oxymoronic
Source

That’s the exact figure of speech used to define the term “affordable luxury”.

It’s a commodity that is affordable by all and yet known to be a luxury, so sorry to break your dream, dear reader, but the idea of being able to buy luxury at a cheap rate is not attainable.

The product you buy is just luxurious in words.

The oxymoron “affordable luxury” is a myth that should be dismissed forever, and instead, the affordable items should be termed as what they actually are.

Giving The Premium Items Their Desired Place

Anyone who’s bought affordable luxury products from the market, knows that their quality isn’t that bad.

Yes, it’s true that these quasi products are like peasants in front of the aristocrats like Prada, but if they are compared to the local products, sold in small shops, they don’t lose at all.

So why not instead of using an oxymoron to describe them, call them for what they are?

The idea is not to blend the best and the mediocre but to keep the best at best and the ordinary at ordinary. This is where the premium commodities come to play.

The idea is not to blend the best and the mediocre but to keep the best at best and the ordinary at ordinary
Source

The quasi-brands attempt to condition the choices of customers and make them buy the low quality premium items under the hoax of “luxury”.

Well not to defame them, but it’s not like marketing them as premium could turn out to be a bad thing.

Why Affordable Luxury And Not The Real One?

After understanding the difference between the affordable luxury and real luxury, the one question that might have arisen in everyone’s mind.

Why is there a need for affordable luxury and Why does India not produce its own luxury brand?

Why indians choose Affordable Luxury And Not The Real One
Source

The answer to that is the mentality of people here. The market owners know that there is negligent presence of big brands here.

Indians have a value conscious mentality. The drive to shop for something does not run on the idea of acquiring an asset but if that asset is going to be useful for them or not?

Indians do know that they can use their brand products as a status symbol yet chose not to buy them due to their exorbitant prices.

It is due to this that the tactics of affordable luxuries are born. At the same time the need to understand the real meaning of these affordable luxuries arises.

When people will know the difference between the affordable luxury products and the real luxury products, awareness will rise, along with the desire to own them.

India rather than using the tactics of “affordable luxury”, might through diligence and hard work, be able to build a Chanal and Gucci of its own.

Luxury Brands
Source

Luxury is meant to be appreciated, regarded, relished, delighted in, and secured.

Genuine luxury has an expense and is an incredible satisfaction all by itself, so people should discover it and audaciously value it!

Also read: Top Fashion Blunders Men Make That Ruin Their Charm

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Business

Psychoanalysis of Fashion after COVID-19 – Necessity or Vanity?

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Psychoanalysis of Fashion after COVID-19

The year 2020 was a year of uncertainties. It hit almost every industry and did not spare the fashion world too. Unlike every year, people in 2020 did not buy things they did not need. They resorted to minimalism, and it had a profound impact on the fashion industry.

A Boston Consulting Group report predicts sales will plummet by 15% in 2021 compared to 2019. If we look back, the crisis of 2008 had a massive impact on shaping the fashion industry, and we expect COVID-19 to be no different.

None of us predicted that face masks would be one of the accessories, let alone being the essential accessory for every wardrobe, it has become. The Met Gala, one of the precursors of the newest trends in the fashion world, got cancelled in 2020, but enthusiasts quickly adapted by switching to online trends.

In 2021, some pertinent questions surround the fashion industry in the grand scheme of things and remain unanswered to date. What will the post-COVID-19 fashion world look like? Will we see a platonic shift in buying patterns? Can brands tackle the changes in sentiment? Are people moving towards treating fashion a vanity more than a necessity? Is sustainable fashion sustainable at all? Does style seem pointless to the masses now?

shift in consumer behaviour surrounding the fashion industry in the post-pandemic world
Source: Canva

COVID-19 brought an abrupt end to the cyclical fashion shows

With the beginning of the 20th Century, we have experienced fashion brands coming together to showcase their latest creation. Interactions like fashion shows had been the breeding space for fashion to be delivered after some months to its customers.

Because of the pandemic, shows like Russia, London, and Shanghai fashion weeks (a costly affair of physically displaying the latest trends) shifted online. Even most brands seeking to showcase their products to the end consumers ended up conducting fashion shows with no audience or releasing documentaries.

Burberry, a luxury brand known for hosting a packed runway show with a host of celebrities, opted for a de-glammed live stream on Twitch with over 42,000 viewers.

This move has not only saved millions of dollars for the premium brands, but has showcased the feasibility of such online endeavors. Drops, a common occurrence in the pre-COVID era, are unlikely to come back at full strength in the next few years.

Digital shows will have a much lower carbon footprint than ordinary shows
Source: Photo by anna-m. w. from Pexels

“Digital shows will have a much lower carbon footprint than ordinary shows because people will not be flying thousands of miles from all over the world to go to shows,” exclaimed Linda Green, a sustainability expert.

Even otherwise, some experts are mulling digital shows as a long-term proposition as it lets the product be the hero, which is often not the case with physical shows. In the latter, we often focus on the person adorning them.

But it is imperative to understand the need to amalgamate the culture and the story with the product to make the result more convincing to the eye. It is an easy guess that we will see physical fashion shows, making a comeback in 2022 or about, but digital shows’ lingering impact will entice more brands to adopt it as their staple.

Also read: The True Meaning Behind the Trend of Affordable Luxury

Remodelling fashion habits to make them more sustainable

In 2019, A McKinsey report suggested that sustainability would be one of the critical drivers for the fashion industry. 2020 further questioned our irresponsible moves and propelled the world to adopt a more constructive approach.

Clothing, especially for those who term themselves “fashionable” has always been about validation. In the last few centuries, these people have flourished and have been useful, primarily because of their status and conspicuous consumption. Today’s scenario is entirely different. These were also considered beneficial for signalling.

The year 2020 was confusing in every sense. Online meet-ups replaced physical ones, hugs went out of fashion, and the visible status symbols were not-so-visible during the period. Also, there must have been people flaunting their Rolex on a Meet call, but the percentage of such people was negligible.

The fashion industry had not experienced such a dearth of demand previously, and all they could do is reinvent the wheel to sustain.

Given the limited scope of travelling, they quickly realized an opportunity lying in inconspicuous consumption. The reignited focus on minimalism and simplicity led to the more sustainable ideas gaining traction and finding a place in many brands’ hearts.

It led to a slew of products focussed on sustainability, hitting the market in the space of a few months. These products also boosted local businesses and led to small businesses’ resurgence who were finding it hard to sustain in the pre-COVID era. The brands also pushed farmers and others in their pipeline to take up environment-friendly initiatives, such as growing organic cotton.

Another issue that demands attention is the fashion industry responsible for utilizing 93 billion cubic metres of water annually. It includes wastage in the form of overproduction and creating of deadstock. A Reverse Resources study reports brand wasting up to 47% of available raw material.

Those acquainted with this industry are no stranger to this practice, and the pandemic was the time for them to rejig their production habits and bring in more sustainability in the mix. Brands can utilize newer and more efficient tech such as Blockchain and IoT and create a circular economy supply chain less prone to wastage.

sustainable Economy
Source: Favpng

A renewed focus on local output

With so much waste being a ritual in the fashion industry, the focus on recycling and valorization is an ordinary happening. Even though many brands engage in exporting the rejected material, local recycling endeavours are a more sustainable approach in the long run. It prevents the brands from unnecessarily high transportation costs and the resulting emissions.

The pandemic has again been an eye-opener of sorts. It showcased the missed opportunity, especially places that lack local finesse and resort to an informal economy for their needs.

The pandemic has also forced brands to an on-demand approach. It helps brands cut down on withholding costs, upfront cash needs, and reduce deadstock chances. They become far better equipped to react with the customer’s pulse and swiftly adapt to the changing conditions.

Also read: Is your favorite brand playing with your personality?

The governments all over the world have also propelled local production by introducing several measures. For example, – The Indian Government introduced #VocalforLocal and #Aatmanirbhar initiatives to boost rural production. These measures would give the necessary boost to propel the local output to garner more attention.

Atmanirbhar Bharat - Vocal for Local
Source: TheBossMonk Original

Fashion will see a congregation of comfort and workwear

I have come across people who could never imagine wearing casuals on a workday. I am pretty sure you have had such experiences to share too. The most significant change that Coronavirus has brought about is casualization. With workplaces shutting down and people stuck in their homes, the meetings would go on without people batting an eyelid on what the attendees wore.

It has broadened the acceptance level and supercharged the inculcation of casual wear in office lives. Even if we look into the sales figure, casual clothing was one of the bright spots for the fashion industry during the pandemic months. The brands have adapted to the change well and have shifted gears to increase their focus on comfort and clothes worn across situations.

For example, Rent the Runway, a brand staunchly known for designer workwear, has now added a “Work from Home” that includes track pants, stretch denim, rocker tees, and more.

The pandemic also blurred the lines between downtime and work. From working to burning calories to managing a kid, everything was happening without a time bracket. We were so used to it, which impacted how we see athleisure and comfort clothing. It resulted in the creation of Athleisure 2.0, an idea that covered everything and seemed comfortable across the board.

Even though we are back to a new normal, we see no reason for a reduced focus on comfort-first across all forms of clothing. “The comfort factor and a more fluid approach to work and leisure have all played their role. We’ve seen iterations of it in the past, but now, as performance fabrics become more sophisticated, they’re better adapted to bridge the gap between work and leisure.” – exclaims Jessica Harman, strategist, WGSN.

We could finally see an end of fashion seasons

There were certain aspects of the fashion industry that were in a bubble and were waiting to disintegrate. One of such terms and practices is fashion season. It seemed unviable for both the manufacturers and the end-users. But high street brands and even consumer brands were adhering to it, anyway. The major problem being unsold inventory and less-than-optimum usage of the sold items.

The past year saw a tremendous decline in demand because of the current situation resulting in the brand sitting on a stockpile of clothing with no buyers. These suffered from a loss of months and finally losing a chunk of its price tag as the year went by, and that irked brand managers.

Another major trouble with this idea was consumers finding it difficult to relate to the fashion and their pertinent worries about the short shelf life. The higher emphasis on digital marketing has also been an indirect push towards non-seasonal trends. The new-age fashionistas are more inclined towards fashion that will stand the test of time and not erode within a few months.

The pandemic has also reiterated the importance of minimalism. The obnoxiously high cost of sifting to new clothes every few days now seems to be a glaring mistake for many. The industry has traditionally followed four different seasons, which are often not in sync with the actualities.

For example, if we are experiencing winter in the USA, it can be summer in India. The growing digitization drive means brands are looking to cater to the world instead of specific regions. So they have, inadvertently, been planning to shift to something more meaningful.

Fashion designer Sanjay Garg, Founder, Raw Mango exclaims, “One should look at this opportunity as a filter to edit offerings across the globe — there is too much already out there. Following trends and seasons dissolves everything in sustainability and organic fashion. Instead, focus on innovation and explore the ways of how one can have a different voice and can sustain growth.”

Instead of offering a bucket load of clothes every few months, the new-age fashion designers quickly anticipate the need to make products available digitally. That way, many people will have instant access to whatever they are trying to sell. Even for brands looking to change the way the industry operated and were looking for the right opportunity, there is no better time.

Health-first is the way for the fashion industry

Probably the post-pandemic world will experience a paradigm shift in both buying patterns and how we see fashion. The pressing issues that have long been repressed have started surfacing, and the world is becoming more aware of every passing day.

The precarious situation has also forced people to look for their health first and then cater to their fashion needs. As facemasks reign high, we expect people to put more emphasis on a sustainable and ethical wardrobe that looks beautiful.

The year 2020 was a year of uncertainties. It hit almost every industry and did not spare the fashion world too. Unlike every year, people in 2020 did not buy things they did not need. They resorted to minimalism, and it had a profound impact on the fashion industry. A Boston Consulting Group report predicts sales will plummet by 15% in 2021 compared to 2019. If we look back, the crisis of 2008 had a massive impact on shaping the fashion industry, and we expect COVID-19 to be no different. None of us predicted that face masks would be one of the accessories, let alone being the essential accessory for every wardrobe, it has become. The Met Gala, one of the precursors of the newest trends in the fashion world, got cancelled in 2020, but enthusiasts quickly adapted by switching to online trends. In 2021, some pertinent questions surround the fashion industry in the grand scheme of things and remain unanswered to date. What will the post-COVID-19 fashion world look like? Will we see a platonic shift in buying patterns? Can brands tackle the changes in sentiment? Are people moving towards treating fashion a vanity more than a necessity? Is sustainable fashion sustainable at all? Does style seem pointless to the masses now? Source: Freepik COVID-19 brought an abrupt end to the cyclical fashion shows With the beginning of the 20th Century, we have experienced fashion brands coming together to showcase their latest creation. Interactions like fashion shows had been the breeding space for fashion to be delivered after some months to its customers. Because of the pandemic, shows like Russia, London, and Shanghai fashion weeks (a costly affair of physically displaying the latest trends) shifted online. Even most brands seeking to showcase their products to the end consumers ended up conducting fashion shows with no audience or releasing documentaries. Burberry, a luxury brand known for hosting a packed runway show with a host of celebrities, opted for a de-glammed live stream on Twitch with over 42,000 viewers. This move has not only saved millions of dollars for the premium brands, but has showcased the feasibility of such online endeavors. Drops, a common occurrence in the pre-COVID era, are unlikely to come back at full strength in the next few years. Because fashion shows move from one part of the world to another, it results in a staggering 241,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emission. As per the UN Environment Programme, the fashion industry in the pre-COVID phase contributed 10% of global carbon emission, a number higher than international flights emission.Source: Photo by anna-m. w. from Pexels “Digital shows will have a much lower carbon footprint than ordinary shows because people will not be flying thousands of miles from all over the world to go to shows,” exclaimed Linda Green, a sustainability expert. Even otherwise, some experts are mulling digital shows as a long-term proposition as it lets the product be the hero, which is often not the case with physical shows. In the latter, we often focus on the person adorning them. But it is imperative to understand the need to amalgamate the culture and the story with the product to make the result more convincing to the eye. It is an easy guess that we will see physical fashion shows, making a comeback in 2022 or about, but digital shows’ lingering impact will entice more brands to adopt it as their staple. Remodelling fashion habits to make them more sustainable In 2019, A McKinsey report suggested that sustainability would be one of the critical drivers for the fashion industry. 2020 further questioned our irresponsible moves and propelled the world to adopt a more constructive approach. Clothing, especially for those who term themselves “fashionable” has always been about validation. In the last few centuries, these people have flourished and have been useful, primarily because of their status and conspicuous consumption. Today’s scenario is entirely different. These were also considered beneficial for signalling. The year 2020 was confusing in every sense. Online meet-ups replaced physical ones, hugs went out of fashion, and the visible status symbols were not-so-visible during the period. Also, there must have been people flaunting their Rolex on a Meet call, but the percentage of such people was negligible. The fashion industry had not experienced such a dearth of demand previously, and all they could do is reinvent the wheel to sustain. Given the limited scope of travelling, they quickly realized an opportunity lying in inconspicuous consumption. The reignited focus on minimalism and simplicity led to the more sustainable ideas gaining traction and finding a place in many brands’ hearts. It led to a slew of products focussed on sustainability, hitting the market in the space of a few months. These products also boosted local businesses and led to small businesses’ resurgence who were finding it hard to sustain in the pre-COVID era. The brands also pushed farmers and others in their pipeline to take up environment-friendly initiatives, such as growing organic cotton. Another issue that demands attention is the fashion industry responsible for utilizing 93 billion cubic metres of water annually. It includes wastage in the form of overproduction and creating of deadstock. A Reverse Resources study reports brand wasting up to 47% of available raw material. Those acquainted with this industry are no stranger to this practice, and the pandemic was the time for them to rejig their production habits and bring in more sustainability in the mix. Brands can utilize newer and more efficient tech such as Blockchain and IoT and create a circular economy supply chain less prone to wastage.  Source: Favpng A renewed focus on local output With so much waste being a ritual in the fashion industry, the focus on recycling and valorization is an ordinary happening. Even though many brands engage in exporting the rejected material, local recycling endeavours are a more sustainable approach in the long run. It prevents the brands from unnecessarily high transportation costs and the resulting emissions. The pandemic has again been an eye-opener of sorts. It showcased the missed opportunity, especially places that lack local finesse and resort to an informal economy for their needs. The pandemic has also forced brands to an on-demand approach. It helps brands cut down on withholding costs, upfront cash needs, and reduce deadstock chances. They become far better equipped to react with the customer’s pulse and swiftly adapt to the changing conditions. The governments all over the world have also propelled local production by introducing several measures. For example, – The Indian Government introduced #VocalforLocal and #Aatmanirbhar initiatives to boost rural production. These measures would give the necessary boost to propel the local output to garner more attention. Source: TheBossMonk Original Fashion will see a congregation of comfort and workwear I have come across people who could never imagine wearing casuals on a workday. I am pretty sure you have had such experiences to share too. The most significant change that Coronavirus has brought about is casualization. With workplaces shutting down and people stuck in their homes, the meetings would go on without people batting an eyelid on what the attendees wore. It has broadened the acceptance level and supercharged the inculcation of casual wear in office lives. Even if we look into the sales figure, casual clothing was one of the bright spots for the fashion industry during the pandemic months. The brands have adapted to the change well and have shifted gears to increase their focus on comfort and clothes worn across situations. For example, Rent the Runway, a brand staunchly known for designer workwear, has now added a “Work from Home” that includes track pants, stretch denim, rocker tees, and more. The pandemic also blurred the lines between downtime and work. From working to burning calories to managing a kid, everything was happening without a time bracket. We were so used to it, which impacted how we see athleisure and comfort clothing. It resulted in the creation of Athleisure 2.0, an idea that covered everything and seemed comfortable across the board. Even though we are back to a new normal, we see no reason for a reduced focus on comfort-first across all forms of clothing. “The comfort factor and a more fluid approach to work and leisure have all played their role. We’ve seen iterations of it in the past, but now, as performance fabrics become more sophisticated, they’re better adapted to bridge the gap between work and leisure.” – exclaims Jessica Harman, strategist, WGSN. We could finally see an end of fashion seasons There were certain aspects of the fashion industry that were in a bubble and were waiting to disintegrate. One of such terms and practices is fashion season. It seemed unviable for both the manufacturers and the end-users. But high street brands and even consumer brands were adhering to it, anyway. The major problem being unsold inventory and less-than-optimum usage of the sold items. The past year saw a tremendous decline in demand because of the current situation resulting in the brand sitting on a stockpile of clothing with no buyers. These suffered from a loss of months and finally losing a chunk of its price tag as the year went by, and that irked brand managers. Another major trouble with this idea was consumers finding it difficult to relate to the fashion and their pertinent worries about the short shelf life. The higher emphasis on digital marketing has also been an indirect push towards non-seasonal trends. The new-age fashionistas are more inclined towards fashion that will stand the test of time and not erode within a few months. The pandemic has also reiterated the importance of minimalism. The obnoxiously high cost of sifting to new clothes every few days now seems to be a glaring mistake for many. The industry has traditionally followed four different seasons, which are often not in sync with the actualities. For example, if we are experiencing winter in the USA, it can be summer in India. The growing digitization drive means brands are looking to cater to the world instead of specific regions. So they have, inadvertently, been planning to shift to something more meaningful. Fashion designer Sanjay Garg, Founder, Raw Mango exclaims, “One should look at this opportunity as a filter to edit offerings across the globe — there is too much already out there. Following trends and seasons dissolves everything in sustainability and organic fashion. Instead, focus on innovation and explore the ways of how one can have a different voice and can sustain growth.” Instead of offering a bucket load of clothes every few months, the new-age fashion designers quickly anticipate the need to make products available digitally. That way, many people will have instant access to whatever they are trying to sell. Even for brands looking to change the way the industry operated and were looking for the right opportunity, there is no better time. Health-first is the way for the fashion industry Probably the post-pandemic world will experience a paradigm shift in both buying patterns and how we see fashion. The pressing issues that have long been repressed have started surfacing, and the world is becoming more aware of every passing day. The precarious situation has also forced people to look for their health first and then cater to their fashion needs. As facemasks reign high, we expect people to put more emphasis on a sustainable and ethical wardrobe that looks beautiful.Source: Freepik The same idea will also rule the way we choose our fashion brands. We expect the ones who foresee the shift and quickly adapt to it being the biggest winners, not only in terms of numbers but also loyalty. Given the scenario we are in, every small step towards sustainability would affect future generations’ well-being. The move towards necessity over vanity had already begun, the introduction of the unwanted pandemic only supercharged it, and in the right way.
Source: Freepik

The same idea will also rule the way we choose our fashion brands. We expect the ones who foresee the shift and quickly adapt to it being the biggest winners, not only in terms of numbers but also loyalty. Given the scenario we are in, every small step towards sustainability would affect future generations’ well-being.

The move towards necessity over vanity had already begun, the introduction of the unwanted pandemic only supercharged it, and in the right way.

Also read: The Best 2020-21 Beauty Trends That Will Make You Feel Ecstatic!

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Is your favorite brand playing with your personality?

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Favorite Brand Playing With Your Personality

Think of the last product you bought. Now think of the motivators behind buying it when you did: Did you buy it out of need? Out of desire? Something long anticipated? Or at the spur of the moment?

Think of the company behind the brand. Is it recent? Or an old favorite for you? What especially appealed to you about their product compared to the choices you had?

Ever wondered how the fashion industry works? Ever thought how that neon green color came into fashion? How everyone started wearing neon green?

Also read: New Normal, Fashionable Face Mask is our Protective Gear

neon green color came into fashion
Image Source: HearStappps

Raymond is a premier clothing brand for men. The tagline of the brand is, ‘The Complete Man’. The brand makes you believe that if you don’t shop from Raymond, you won’t look manly enough.

The raymond Shop
Source: Business World

If we talk about the deodorant brand, Axe, their advertisement shows women running after a man after he uses the Axe deodorant. They showed that women are attracted to the men who use Axe. These brands manipulate and dictate your decisions.

advertisement shows women running after a man after he uses the Axe deodorant
Image Source: IndiaTimes

Aren’t these brands playing with our psychology?

Decoding the cycle

Firstly, whenever the fashion industry sees a downfall, they come up with a new trend. Slowly that trend seeps in, and everyone goes crazy about it. From the queen to the biggest superstars, everyone starts following the trend. And BAM! The industry is in profits again.

Secondly, fashion brands advertise their designs in a way that we end up idealizing them. We feel that it is the new normal. They advertise how your personality will change with a neon green T-shirt, how professional and up to date, you will end up looking.

Thirdly, aggressive marketing does the deed for them. In the era of Facebook and YouTube, where endorsing a brand to influence people’s minds is not that difficult; we let these brands play with our mindset. We follow the herd mentality of loving their designs, and we adapt ourselves to them.

How do brands play with your personality?

  • By giving social proof: You went to a party and saw your friend flaunting her stilettos from Louis Vuitton, which were not only stylish but also comfortable, and immediately decided to buy a pair. We all have done that! We are more likely to buy from a company when we see other people using and enjoying their products.

And with social media marketing becoming a rage, positive reviews, vast number of active users, and positive user-generated content make a potential customer buying from a brand more likely. When we see the Queen and the Kardashians wearing neon green, we go gaga over it.

  • Scarcity: Rare items are valuable. Think about precious gems, like rubies or emeralds — their scarcity makes their worth more. That means that if there’s a shortage, people place a higher value on items. This brings in fear of missing out (FOMO). People will deliberately buy those neon green shoes when the brands start calling them ‘limited edition.’
neon green fashion trend
Source: https://culturacolectiva.com
  • Reciprocity: When you buy the neon boots, you will eventually start posting pictures on social media to show the world that you have these life-saving boots, you are up to date. You will give the brand free publicity and make this trend all the more popular.
  • Loss Aversion: This is the strategy to study people’s preference to avoid a loss over gaining an equal amount. We’re more upset about losing the neon shoes worth $200 than we’re happy to find them. Perhaps the intense anxiety and fear that are associated with loss, such negative emotions have a more substantial and lasting effect on people than the positive ones. We will buy the shoes no matter what!

Branding Strategies a.k.a Tricks They Play with Your Thought Process

Branding agencies target the audience in a way that people tend to relate to their advertisements. Haven’t  you ever experienced this ever? Well, that’s what these brands thrive upon.

  • Apple is best known for its revolutionary and stylistically recognizable style. It is what a lot of people enjoy about the company and the goods they make. In 2015, they came up with a commercial, “Friends Furever,” which now holds over 30 million views on YouTube. They highlighted unexpected animal partnerships that elicit galore adorable appeal; they created a more profound message that fosters empathy and care within a world of differences. This emotional appeal got them a lot of customers. Surprisingly, various companies made counter ads to get more publicity. Google came up with the commercial, “Best Friends Furever” to promote android. This is how branding is done and how customers are attracted.
be together not the same
Source: https://www.talkandroid.com/
  • Established brands find new ways to express their brand identity to potential consumers – like Nike, and it’s “What’s Your Motivation” show. This underdog piece speaks how most people relate to the side of fighting, with little recognition and that they are more than just clothes, but the differentiating factors between success and failure, perseverance, and loss. Nike created advertising around such a recognizable and emotionally fuelled persona.
Nike Quoate - Write the Future
Source: https://cutewallpaper.org/

Advertising exerts psychological influences through emotional bonds, will you let the brands choose the life you want to live?

The Boss Monk feels that the fear of being different  makes people fall prey to all the trends. Now, some trends might be productive, but many of them are a total mess. It all depends on you! Whether you would like to be controlled by the dirty games of branding or you want to control them. Just don’t end up being tricked!

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